The emergence of over-the-top video platforms such as Netflix and YouTube, the entry of other players like television distributions in areas such as television production and aggregation, and the ever-intensifying internationalization of media markets are a disruptive force in the competitive dynamics of television broadcasting. The traditional way of doing business, of valorizing television content, and of dealing with commercial rivalry is under pressure and will be no more in 10 years time.
 
Against this background, television companies engage in defensive and/or offensive strategies to ensure continuing growth. In so doing, they compete with media companies that ‘play’ in another regulatory field (in the case of telecommunications and cable companies) or without significant media/communication-specific rules at all (in the case of over-the-top players). Indeed, competition rules apply to all those companies that operate in the internal market and some emerging strategies might be at odds with the rationale of European competition law. Having said that, some actually question whether traditional competition policy is efficient, effective, and/or necessary to deal with the competition challenges in the television broadcasting industry – if such a separate market can be delineated any longer.
 
This one-day conference focuses on the challenges of competition and competition policies in television broadcasting markets. How is the evolution from a two-sided market to platform economics reshaping competition in television broadcasting? Do gatekeeper positions call for a different or more stringent regulatory approach? How are new market dynamics changing competition for content creation and acquisition? Will content remain king? Or will new competitive dynamics undermine the sustainable creation of high quality content, especially in small media markets? Is there a need for additional media-specific regulation in this regard and are new taxation instruments in France, Germany, Flanders, etc. instructive? Is the television broadcasting sector internationalizing further? What is the impact thereof on the sector? What is the role for competition policy in fostering cross-border distribution of audiovisual works? How should the on-going merger and acquisition activity between content and distribution markets be addressed?
 
These and other questions will be addressed by several distinguished academic scholars, policy makers, and industry representatives at the third “Private Television in Europe” conference “Competition Rules?!”.
 
We cordially invite you to attend this conference, taking place on 3 June 2015, in Brussels, and other events part of the Media Week (2-5 June 2015). 
The Gap Is Mine!